4.25.2005

other people's brains are my intellectual property.


i'm not allowing myself to form any thoughts of my own today other than about copyright law. copyright, copyright, copyright. wouldnt it be amazing if i was able to learn something about the nature of copyright law simply by repeating the word over and over? right.

anyway, since i'm doing all of of you and myself a favor by not thinking today, i'm at license to share the thoughts of others and pretend that if i was actually thinking today, these are some of the things i would be thinking about.

MY brilliant non-existent thoughts of the day (in list form):


1.


In form you are the microcosm;
in reality you are the macrocosm.

-Mathnawi [IV, 521] From the Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright 1946, 1952, 1971 by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA.


2.
Sexual Revolutionaries -- "Persepolis" author Marjane Satrapi talks about why Iranians don't think sex is sinful, the hypocrisy of American saber-rattling over Iran, and why George Bush and the mullahs are "the same." salon.com

interesting quotes from the interview: [disclaimer: i havent read the book. i also dont agree with everything she says in the interview. but to be fair, i also dont agree with everything that comes out of my own mouth. so this is still a valid MY thought of the day. end of disclaimer.]



"If I have any advice, it's that every day that you wake up, don't say, "This is normal." Every day, wake up with this idea that you have to defend your freedom. Nobody has the right to take from women the right to abortion, nobody has the right to take from homosexuals the right to be homosexual, nobody has the right to stop people laughing, to stop people thinking, to stop people talking.

If I have one message to give to the secular American people, it's that the world is not divided into countries. The world is not divided between East and West. You are American, I am Iranian, we don't know each other, but we talk together and we understand each other perfectly. The difference between you and your government is much bigger than the difference between you and me. And the difference between me and my government is much bigger than the difference between me and you. And our governments are very much the same."


"They all the time talk about security. Security, security, security. But when you talk about security, then everything is about being safe. And being safe also means having less freedom."



"Democracy, contrary to what they try to tell us, it's not a paper that you hang on the wall and then you have a democracy. Democracy is a social evolution. It is something cultural. Iranians, they have become much more secular, and they are ready for democracy, but they have to fight themselves for democracy, and the only thing that other countries can do is to understand their fight and help them in their fight."

"In Iran, sex is a problem before marriage. After marriage, it's much less of a problem. Here in the West, I very rarely hear older women, 60 or 65, talking about sex. From the moment they have menopause, sex is over for women. In Iran, I think it goes for a longer time."



3. The Guardian has a Special Report on racial dynamics in the UK. An article in the report discusses how a british appellate court recently ruled that use of the word "immigrant" as an insult can amount to proof of racial hostility. interesting stuff.


4.
someone else's [MY]
thoughts about the pope. after having gone to two extremely ideologically different catholic schools, its more than apparent that the selection of cardinal ratzinger as the next pope will only further the ever growing divide between the members of the catholic church. the first school i attended viewed vatican ii as a heroic attempt by the church to appease the controversial demands made by some clergy and followers that the church finally acknowledge both modernity and the church's geographical expansion into the third world. i was taught that the correct way to interpret the church's half-hearted doctrinal shift was that it was a door that the church had to open, but that good catholics could not and should not walk through it. the second catholic school i attended was much more non-traditional in its viewpoints (and was interestingly enough, an all female school). there i was taught that vatican ii was a sign of returning to the essential spirit of christianity and that a third vatican council was bound to convene in the not too distant future. my liberal catholic teachers won the battle for my soul. i still cant get over the fact that conclave of cardinals chose pope benedict as their spiritual leader. as a muslim, i can only sympathize with the frustration of many catholics after this pronouncement. going back to what Marjane Satrapi mentioned above, we arent really all that different now, are we?

[okay i somewhat cheated there. im not supposed to be thinking and rambling about my own inane stupid thoughts. STUPID SAMAR. copyright, copyright, copyright.]

5. blogger jlkjf;adkfad dork. blaaaaaaaaaah. blah.

6.


what you waiting
what you waiting
what you waiting
what you waiting
what you waiting for?


[special thanks to gwen stefani & her harajuku girls]

4 Comments:

Blogger wanderer said...

copyright, copyright, copyright. it's not working. oh if you click together your ruby red slippers, it works.

1:21 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

samar you crack me (umbreen) up. oh and i hope you don't dislike me (umbreen) intensely but i understand if you do.

2:24 AM  
Blogger s am a r said...

hi umbreen!!!!! i just saw your comment. its so exciting to get comments. its like getting presents. and dont worry, i like you (intensely). hopefully your finals are going better than mine.

11:44 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

o. i (umbreen) have been delinquent about checking back to post a comment to say thank you so very much for liking me so very intensely. i hope you don't choke when you get hooded like some of my classmates did. it was funny. but awkward. congrats :)

12:07 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home